Terms Of The Good Friday Agreement

The vague wording of some provisions, called “constructive ambiguities”[8], helped to secure acceptance of the agreement and postpone debate on some of the most controversial issues. These include paramilitary dismantling, police reform and the standardisation of Northern Ireland. The previous text has only four articles; It is this short text that is the legal agreement, but it incorporates the last agreement into its timetables. [7] From a technical point of view, this draft agreement can be distinguished as a multi-party agreement, unlike the Belfast Agreement itself. [7] The Anglo-Irish Agreement is an agreement between the British and Irish governments. The agreement is promised to the various institutions defined in the multi-party agreement. It also sets out the agreed position of the two governments on the current and future status of Northern Ireland. In particular, it is found that the functioning of the Northern Ireland Assembly and the North-South Council of Ministers is “so closely linked that the success of the other depends on the success of the other”, and participation in the North-South Council of Ministers is “one of the essential tasks related to the relevant posts in [Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland]”. In 2004, negotiations were held between the two governments, the DUP and Sinn Féin, with a view to an agreement on institution-building.

These talks failed, but a document released by governments detailing changes to the Belfast Agreement has been known as the “Global Agreement”. However, on 26 September 2005, it was announced that the Commissional Irish Republican Army had completely closed and “decommissioned” its weapons arsenal. Yet many trade unionists, especially the DUP, remained skeptical…